Archive for August, 2010

One of the main lessons Yoga teaches is “be present”. Essentially, we learn to honor a given moment and whatever it may hold — physically, mentally, emotionally, spiritually and/or energetically — and let go of the rest.  This practice leads to a more equanimous/peaceful existence, rather than one that constantly reacts to sensation.  This practice also leads to questioning the small and large parts of our lives like, “Is what I’m doing (now or in my life) important?”, “Is this *object* important?”, “Does this experience/object/choice/sensation provide true fulfillment? Or only momentary satisfaction?”, “Am I filling my life and time with that which is important for my Happiness, or am I simply filling my life and time?”  Lately, I’ve been compelled to really look at what fills my life and my focus fell on all the “SCHTUFF” filling my home … and I felt a little ill.  It was past time to declutter. Read the rest of this entry »

One of the things I’ve been learning, and with which I’ve struggled for a long time, is the concept that Yoga and Yoga Asana means much more than the one or one-and-a-half hour classes I attend.  Part of my struggle lies in the resistance to that idea.  That is, of course, my competitive and ego driven part of me peeking through. But due to an overburdened schedule which makes getting into the studio that much more challenging, I’m finding that if I want Yoga Asana, then I’d better re-evaluate my ideas around it.  And what I’ve begun to learn lately is that Yoga Asana can be found and done everywhere, even in the most unexpected places — and it can be FUN. Read the rest of this entry »

Happy Bhutan ChildrenLately, I’ve been struggling with a general sense of … restlessness.  Assessing my life, my wants, my needs, my goals, etc., etc.  I’m bored and frustrated in certain aspects of my life, hopeful and joyful in others.  But what I realized was that I, more often than not, get caught up in what causes dissatisfaction.  I don’t know if it’s a human thing, an American thing, or just a Deb thing, but it’s SO EASY to focus on the negative, and lose track of the positive. But then I read this great blog, Taking Charge of Your Happiness, on Jen Gresham’s Everyday Bright blog site, “offer(ing) … insights regarding happiness in the Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan“, and it got me thinking. What makes ME happy? Am I happy? What’s this restlessness about?  Just how healthy IS my Gross National Happiness?

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Yup, the dentist chair!  I had my six month cleaning last night and was not looking forward to the appointment. Now, mind you, I really like my dentist and staff (Dr. Hoang at Unique Dental in Attleboro, MA) — probably the least painful dental experiences I’ve had in years.  However, I’m quite sensitive to sound and I’ve never really gotten past the sound — or feeling — the instruments make when in contact with my teeth. *Shudder* BUT, taking care of my teeth is just as important as taking care of the rest of me which meant I needed to calm down and somehow convince my shoulder and neck muscles that their location up by my ears wasn’t actually helpful.  So, as I sat in the chair prepared to endure the cleaning, it occurred to me that this was the perfect opportunity to apply some yogic breathing and meditation.    Read the rest of this entry »

Over this past weekend, I received a call from a friend asking about some hiking dates and I realized that, wow, I haven’t been on a hike in probably two months! What happened? Life, obligations and some other fun stuff happened. But I’m overdue so I sat down last night and started thinking about the next hike and it occurred to me that this process just might be helpful to those new to hiking, and specifically new to hiking in New Hampshire’s White Mountains.

First Step:  Choosing the hike
Franconia Ridge, White Mountains, New Hamshire

Taking a break on Franconia Ridge in the White Mountains about 7 years ago.

I’ve hiked a lot of mountains in the White Mountain National Forest, but in the past few years, I haven’t made it north as often as I used to or would like to. So what does this mean? It means I need to assess my cardio/fitness abilities and make that a crucial point in determining which mountain to tackle. I work out and practice yoga, but I haven’t kept up the cardio level necessary to climb 4,000+ ft mountains with ease.  Perfect moment for yoga mindfulness — asking myself how fit am I NOW? When planning this type of hike, you need to ask yourself the same question, and answer honestly — it’s crucial to both enjoying the hike and remaining safe. Read the rest of this entry »