Posts Tagged ‘compassion’

I was honored and quite happy to guest write for this week’s BizeeBee blog. I wrote the post focused on teachers, but I think it can apply to anyone who is over-scheduled and feeling overwhelmed. 

Read the post and remember to leave a comment and tell us what you think!

Shanti, Shanti, Namaste.

Statue of Patanjali, the codifier of Yoga

It’s been such a long time since I’ve devoted time and attention to my blog, and the causes are varied.  We forget that even events that we consider joyous can throw us out of balance and I’ve re-learned that over the the last two to three months; two to three months which have been overwhelming with events wonderful, challenging and even sad.  These events and circumstances simply kept reinforcing the theme with which I always struggle when it comes to applying it to myself — Ahimsa (non-harming/non-violence, the first in the Yamas & Niyamas.) And the last few months have had me revisiting and relearning Ahimsa on a daily basis. Read the rest of this entry »

MeditationSo, you think you’re the only one who struggles with meditation?  Trust me, you’re not!  And to help reassure you of that fact, I thought I’d share a typical meditation moment. The one that occurs after I’ve dimmed the lights, shut off the computer, turned off the phone ringer (I use the Zen Timer on my phone to time my meditation), arranged my meditation cushions, settled in, closed my eyes and started to focus inward seeking the peace, quiet and serenity, only to find the reality of practice.

Inhale. Exhale. Oh, I must shift, I’m not comfortable, I’ll never be able to sit for 30 minutes.  Ok. Inhale. Exhale. Inhale … Are my sit bones even? Focus! Back to the breath. Inhale. Exhale. Inhale. Exhale. Did I remember to put bread on the grocery list? Iggy’s bread would be good, wonder if there’ll be any left? Darn it! Focus! Inhale. Exhale. Read the rest of this entry »

I find myself — more often than not these days — fried, frazzled and overly fatigued. And although I seem to go through cycles of this state, it constantly takes me by surprise. How can I be frazzled? Aren’t I a “good” Yogi?  …. Hmmm … then that question stops me cold. Because, judgment filled as it is, it’s really not about being “good” or “bad” — there’s no such thing.  However, this situation feels bad and full of suffering.  Now, the Bhagavad Gita explains that “even a little Yoga can save one from much suffering”.  Ahimsa MandalaHmm, well, this simple statement can sometimes feel really complicated to execute.  First of all, our western, American minds usually turn immediately to Asana when we think of Yoga.  And really, Asana is just one of the eight “limbs” outlined by Patanjali within the Yoga Sutras. In Yoga Sutras 2.35-2.45, Patanjali outlined some basic precepts for living our Yoga.  If I’m fried, frazzled and fatigued, then I can’t possibly be honoring the first “observance” of the first “limb” (the Yamas) — Ahimsa, (Non-harming/non-violence.)   

Read the rest of this entry »

Happy Bhutan ChildrenLately, I’ve been struggling with a general sense of … restlessness.  Assessing my life, my wants, my needs, my goals, etc., etc.  I’m bored and frustrated in certain aspects of my life, hopeful and joyful in others.  But what I realized was that I, more often than not, get caught up in what causes dissatisfaction.  I don’t know if it’s a human thing, an American thing, or just a Deb thing, but it’s SO EASY to focus on the negative, and lose track of the positive. But then I read this great blog, Taking Charge of Your Happiness, on Jen Gresham’s Everyday Bright blog site, “offer(ing) … insights regarding happiness in the Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan“, and it got me thinking. What makes ME happy? Am I happy? What’s this restlessness about?  Just how healthy IS my Gross National Happiness?

Read the rest of this entry »

I once took a management seminar in which the facilitator was discussing how to deal with the ubiquitous “How are you?” in the work place.  We all know that the person asking has simply expanded, “Hello”, and they don’t really want to know how you’re doing unless the answer is, “Great! That project proposal you need is all set.” or “Great! I just scored tickets to the Superbowl!”  They don’t want to know anything else — they’re busy with their own angst-ridden day.  The only folks who may really want to hear your true answer when they ask are your girlfriends, buddies or loving family members  …  So how do you answer your coworker when your day isn’t great and still practice Right Speech … In other words, not be a liar? Read the rest of this entry »

Natarajasana -- Dancer Pose

Natarajasana -- Dancer Pose

Yoga Asana can be a beautiful thing to behold. When we experience — or see — poses done with grace and ease, it can fill us with peace, joy and a sense of wonder and accomplishment. Although we strive for detachment, to show no preference for one pose over another, this doesn’t tend to be our reality. I don’t know about you, but I definitely have some poses that I find delightful (Eka Pada Rajakapotasana (Pigeon), Ardha Chandrasana (Standing Half Moon), Bakasana (Crane/Crow), Virhabradrhasana II (Warrior II) are just some), and some that I find downright challenging, to put in nicely, like Mandukasana (Frog Pose), Gomukhasana (Cow Face Pose) or Purvottanasana (Upward Plank Pose). Read the rest of this entry »

Commitment is a large word, or perhaps, I should say a difficult word.  It’s a word that conjures up many different shades of meaning for many different people.  I’ve thought of myself as a commitment phobe for most of my adult life.  I suppose you could say I was soured on the word early on when my marriage — married right out of college at the tender age of 22 — failed spectacularly and painfully.  And without much conscious thought, I found myself scared to commit.  Didn’t like a job? I’d leave it.  A relationship … or first date(!) … not working? I’d leave it.  Not happy about where I was living? I’d move.  By the time I hit my mid-thirties, I was exhausted. Read the rest of this entry »

I went to one of my favorite yoga classes tonight (www.innerhappiness.com), feeling almost … desperate for some release.  Work was successfully doing what it does almost every day — making me feel overwhelmed and inadequate to the daily tasks, and my neck and shoulders were responding in turn. I thought a yoga class would be the balm I needed … And it was, it just gifted itself in an unexpected way. Read the rest of this entry »

The Guest House — Rumi

This being human is a guest house.
Every morning a new arrival.

A joy, a depression, a meanness,
some momentary awareness comes
as an unexpected visitor.

Welcome and entertain them all!
Even if they’re a crowd of sorrows,
who violently sweep your house
empty of its furniture,
still, treat each guest honorably.
He may be clearing you out
for some new delight.

The dark thought, the shame, the malice,
meet them at the door laughing,
and invite them in.

Be grateful for whomever comes,
because each has been sent
as a guide from beyond.

I find Rumi, at this moment, both beautiful and *incredibly* difficult. My human house is overflowing today with all sorts of uncomfortable visitors — self-recrimination, feelings of discontent, restlessness, disconnection, anxiety, fear, joy, love … well, you get the idea. Read the rest of this entry »